The world likes a man with a plan.

(I say man instead of woman mostly because woman with a plan doesn’t rhyme quite as well. As anyone knows, rhyming is essential to making any important point. :P)

People like people with plans because they’re predictable.

People like other people being predictable.

Your parents want you to have a plan. They’ll ask you what you’re going to do for a living. Or they’ll ask you where you want to go to college.

The answers you give can comfort them.

What you’re going to do for college is important to them. They care and have an opinion on the matter. By asking you, you can answer them and put them at ease. The plan you provide them will make you a predictable person. Instead of worrying about what you’re going to be doing years from now, they get to worry about other things. Right?

Your plan makes you a known quantity.

In fact, you’ve probably heard plenty of success stories from people with a plan.

Successful people tell their story as if they went along a logical path the whole time. They did this thing. Then they did this thing. Then they did this next thing that the previous things prepared them for. It sounds like a logical path.

Here is the thing:

Most of the people I’ve met that make those logical path claims are full of crap. Sure… they might genuinely believe it but to a third party observer those logical paths often look completely ridiculous and unpredictable.

I’m going out on a limb here because maybe it’s just me but…

My plans in life have sucked.

Nothing ever went according to plan.

I did things. I learned things. I tried and retried things. Every time I stumbled forward or back a bit.

At no point in this journey, did I think I would take the path I ended up taking.

I just looked to the next step and stumbled in that direction.

Usually, I ended up nowhere near where I planned.

The point:

It still worked out.

I love planning things out in advance but my experience says the successful implementation of a plan depends heavily of improvisation and learning to appreciate the opportunities you get.

Sure… make a plan but don’t get discouraged when you don’t get somewhere you wanted to be.

Just make a new plan and try again.

The destination may be in question but the detours make the trip worthwhile.


Image Sources: Wikipedia

On Winging It

Lets start with one email…

I want to tell you the stories, the strategies, and the secrets I used to get near the top of my class. (And, this comes from the guy that almost failed an art class. Thankfully – I learned a few things since then.)

My name is Aaron.

Less than once a day, I send emails to students that want to improve their grades and their lives. (Sign up takes a couple extra emails.)

I tell stories and we all share what we know. (Warning: I’m also an author – and I’m not shy about recommending my books. No surprises here.)

One email can give you the one idea you need to change your life.

That’s why I do this. And that’s why you should sign up and verify your email.

(Don’t worry. Your info will not be shared. I make my living selling books. Not personal info.)

– Aaron

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