In the past I viewed discipline as a kind of iron-fisted dictator living in my brain.

It would bark orders at my body and I’d follow through with those orders perfectly. Having an iron-fisted dictator has its advantages in life. It makes it easier to study. When you don’t have a choice of whether or not you’re going to study, you don’t have to think about it. You just do it.

Being told what to do is easy. Living with that iron-fisted dictator allowed me to boost my grades dramatically whenever I wanted. It never really fulfilled me though. I would always have this incomplete feeling whenever I succeeded. It would be nice but I always felt that I was missing some of the pleasure.

The credit for my success seemed to go towards the iron-fisted dictator in my brain. I would get caught up thinking that following those orders blindly is what led me to my success. I almost lost track of the fact that I’m the one giving those orders.

I couldn’t blame anyone for being satisfied living with a dictator style discipline. It works.

These days I tend to prefer a more nuanced view. I think of my brain more like a republic. Discipline is more like a general. When the general barks an order, the troops fall in line. The general can’t just bark orders randomly though. The general needs permission from the republic.

My bones, my muscles, my head, and each individual part of me has its own representative in my brain. If I were considering studying when I had a fever, different parts of me would have different opinions about whether or not to study.

My brain might think “Yea. I could study,” while my body is saying “I will constantly distract you from the study material.” The votes are all cast (through more of a trusted feeling than literal voting,) and the decision is made. If the studying is approved then the general steps in to make sure everything gets done.

Ultimately, this is just a feeling. It’s all just a different kind of feeling. Discipline isn’t just doing what you need to do. Discipline is also having the discipline to not do something when it’s not the right time for it.

Making those distinctions are dangerous. A bad student will constantly think, “now is not the right time.”

It’s a great tool for procrastination but it is possible to use it responsibly.

The Discipline of Not Studying

PLEASE STOP!

This is an absolutely essential read for anyone on this blog.

I’m about 4 hours away from something big.

The story began a decade ago when I first started to share my study strategies with other students.

I had figured out the Holy Grail of academic optimization strategies – and every intermediate step to get to it. Using this strategy, I pulled a nearly 4.0 GPA while running a double course load in college – and once I started sharing it.

Students noticed.

Droves of them.

And then teachers noticed.

Most of the teachers that were looking out for their student’s best interest got what I was saying and supported the cause. Others… well… not everyone has the student’s best interest at heart.

Anyway…

Early on (even before Smart Student Secrets,) I started writing for average students.

I knew… I was NEVER one of the “smart kids”. I was mediocre at best. And I knew, if these strategies worked for me then they could work for just about anybody. And that’s who I wanted to connect with.

But… There was a problem…

I built an audience giving these strategies away. Sure…

And I’d get messages from them. And we’d talk. And I’d hear their stories.

I’d hear from A+ students that cut their study time by 90%.

I’d hear from B students that took their grades up to A’s.

I’d hear from teachers that were sharing my strategies with their students.

I’d hear from older students how these strategies changed their life.

I love it. I love introducing these strategies that changed my life to other people.

But there was always this… but…

What about the C students?

What about the D students?

What about the students that are currently failing?

Sure… Some would reach out.. but…

They never followed through… They’d take a small step. They’d sign up. They’d learn some killer strategies. Seeing right there how powerful they were going to be…

And then… life kicks in. They lose sight of their goals.

And it’s gone.

Forever.

Student’s came to this site to improve their life. They see the possibilities. But then… they move on.

In about 4 hours, I’m going to be introducing something – an email subscriber exclusive – that can help change that.

It’s going to make more Smart Students than at any other time in this site’s history.

If you’re ready to take your academic game to the next level – if you want to see it for yourself.

Write your email in the box. Check the confirmation you want emails. Confirm your email. And see for yourself.

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2 thoughts on “The Discipline of Not Studying

  • September 29, 2019 at 5:11 am
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    Learned a lot. Super easy to fully grasp. Many thanks for sharing 🙂

    Reply
  • February 26, 2016 at 6:28 am
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    That’s incredible. I had no idea that some people are so disciplined that giving up studying for a while might be incredibly difficult for them. I learn something new everyday.
    I wish I had this kind of problem instead of the opposite!
    You are a talented writer. I really liked the dictator metaphor. Looking forward to reading more of your posts!

    Reply

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