One of my favorite methods of studying has always been dispersing the studying through my day randomly. I would put a set of flashcards in my pocket and look at them whenever I had a few seconds to spare. Using that strategy it was virtually pointless to sit down and worry about studying.

I suspect this works well because study time is usually the worst time to study.

It’s hard to remember boring information. Most of studying for most students is insanely boring. That makes trying to remember information an absolutely miserable chore. Your brain doesn’t care to remember the information because you’re giving it every reason not to care. (You’re sitting still. You’re not eating. You’re not reproducing. You’re not getting feel good hormones from anything.) You’re making the information completely unmemorable.

When you’re waiting in line at a store or something, your brain was being stimulated seconds before. It was looking at stuff or people around you. There may be sounds that catch your attention. All these things can be memorable for your brain. Randomly introducing study stimuli during those moments increases the chance you’ll remember them compared to a boring afternoon sitting at a desk looking at a textbook.

On this blog I try to teach how to make study time a better time to study. Using certain strategies during study time can make it more efficient but if you had the discipline (and nerdiness) to study randomly through the day, you’d rarely even need an official study time because you’d already be done with most of it.

I still recommend the 15 Minute Study Strategy because you’re much more likely to follow through consistently with it. It also doesn’t require flash cards which could end up taking a enough time to ruin all the time gains anyway. My point is that a big part of studying is figuring out how to make study time suck less for studying (without ruining the studying part.)

The Worst Time To Study

Every Journey Starts With A Single Step


If there is one thing I’ve learned in life…

It’s that decisions are about risk.

I’m going to tell you some stuff that sounds pretty crazy.

Want to learn:

  • Why You Screwed Up In The Past Because Of The Things They Forced You To Do – And What To Do Instead
  • How To Get A Top Score (Even If You’re Failing Assignments Now)
  • 5 Biggest Reasons Students Get Bummed And Give Up
  • How to prepare for a test so well that test day is easier than studying
  • Learn to predict what’s on the test with (almost) perfect accuracy
  • How to use the most science-backed study strategy to study in a fraction of the time

That’s the kind of stuff we keep bottled up for people that sign up to our email list. Including tons of members-only articles.

Now let’s get back to decisions…
You can take a chance and sign up for this email list… Or you can never take a shot.

What’s the risk here?

Tagged on:                 

4 thoughts on “The Worst Time To Study

  • October 26, 2019 at 10:13 pm
    Permalink

    Realized a lot. Super easy to understand. Many thanks for sharing 🙂

    Reply
  • February 12, 2016 at 6:50 am
    Permalink

    This is a really interesting method of studying! I’ve never considered it before. I always avoid studying till the last possible moment.
    My question is, do you make the flash cards yourself or do you buy them? It seems like quite a hassle to make cards for every lesson.

    Reply
  • February 11, 2016 at 8:35 pm
    Permalink

    I have used this technique and it has worked amazingly for me, along with sporadic studying I also study main concepts 15 minutes before I go to sleep. With these two studying techniques my grades have improved and my studying time has decreased!

    Reply
  • February 10, 2016 at 6:22 pm
    Permalink

    Wow, this is so great because I feel now like I’m not the only one with this problem, I have a really big disorder in studying, I sometimes can’t study at home and I must go to the library, what should I do to be more motivated to learn at home?

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *